How to Create a Press Kit for your Business

I recently collaborated with an upcoming jewellery designer to create a press kit for her new brand.

Working closely with the designer, we created a press kit that appropriately represented her new brand whilst providing the right amount of information to potential press.

The kit needed to be professionally presented and structured in order to brief the press but also to ensure the information was correctly communicated.

I used an 8- step structure to create the kit, which consisted of:

1. The Who, What, When, Where, Why and How of the brand

This stage involved gathering as much information as possible from the designer. I wanted to create something that would provide the press with an all-round understanding of the brand whilst maintaining the brand’s messaging, voicing and integrity.

Here, I began the press kit with an overview of the company and some background information, including the Who, What, When, Where, Why and How of the brand. I wanted to keep the press kit professional and accessible, as the whole point of a press kit is to ensure that the press can access the information they need quickly and easily.

This section included information about the jewellery collection, including what the jewellery items were made from and where the stones and diamonds were sourced from.

We then provided information on how the brand was launched and where the source of inspiration came from for creating the jewellery collection, followed by details about sponsors and exhibitions.

For section one, I also created a Mission Statement for the company, as well as a paragraph of text outlining the company’s vision.

2. Biography of CEO/founder

This section is all about the founder/founders of the company, as well as any notable execs who require a mention. For the jewellery brand, we focused on creating a biography of the jewellery designer, including how she became interested in jewellery and jewellery design/creation, as well as some background information on her work experience and academia.

A biography is something rather personal so you have to collaborate closely with each individual to include the information they wish to be included, in a manner that they are happy with. When working with the designer, there were certain aspects that she wanted to emphasise, and others that she didn’t feel were necessary to mention. We worked carefully together on this section to ensure the content appropriately reflected who she is and how she wants to be portrayed.

3. Any recent Press Releases

If you have any recent press releases, these need to be added to this section.

4. Product/Services Fact Sheet

In this section, I emphasised what sets this jewellery brand apart from the competition. We focused on some key areas of the jewellery that are unique, including where the inspiration came from four specific pieces, what each piece is made from and some specific details about the materials used to create each piece. We also mentioned where the items are available to purchase and some information about placing orders.

Of course, this section is unique to each brand and can be structured in line with your preferences. Some businesses prefer an ‘FAQ’ style factsheet – it is totally up to you. What’s important is that you collaborate with the writer to ensure the section is structured and written in a manner that positively represents your brand and provides all the information the press would require in a clear and accessible way.

5. Case Studies

If your business or brand has received any customer testimonials, these need to be included here. They must be professionally presented and directed at the media, but must not have any promotional ties (remember the press kit is for the media and therefore not for marketing purposes).

6. Any Noteworthy Press Coverage

If the company has any press coverage or up-to-date media (including relevant news) this is where it should be showcased. Anything that shows that brand/founder as an industry leader should be included here. When including press coverage, the name of the original outlet and a link to the original article should also be featured.

7. Industry Awards, achievements and accolades

Here we included any notable awards, achievements, mentions and accolades the brand has received, including a brief description of each. The purpose of this section is to highlight the brand’s importance in its field and position it as a company the media needs to know about.

8. Contact information

Finally, it may seem obvious but a press kit is not a press kit without some contact information! This section needs (at the minimum) an email address and telephone number, but it would also be worth adding a website address, physical address and some social media contacts.

Press kits are unique to each and every business, but this is the structure I personally adhere to when creating one. It ensures that information gets included in a consistent, factual manner that is easily accessible to the press, whilst giving an opportunity to showcase the brand and what makes it special.

If you’re looking for a writer to create your Press Kit or other materials, get in touch!

 

Lessons from 4 Brands that Failed at Content Marketing

Green pencil with shavings

Let’s face it, not every business is going to get their content marketing strategy right, every single time. Even some of the world’s biggest brands have made mistakes, and the biggest positive is that we can learn from these mistakes when we implement our own marketing strategies.

With that in mind, here are 4 businesses that failed at content marketing, and what we can learn from those failures:

Malaysia Airlines

In 2014, Malaysia Airlines was struck with not one, but two flight disasters. In an effort to get the company back on track, they ran a contest asking people to send in their ‘bucket lists’ in exchange for free prizes. Since a bucket list is a list of things you want to do before you die, people were quick to make the link between the previous accidents and the bucket lists – which didn’t bode well for the campaign.

Lesson: Think your campaigns through; be willing to cancel a bad idea before it plays out.

Levi’s

Levi’s infamously created a campaign that sold jeans with the tagline ‘Hotness comes in all shapes and sizes.’ The problem was, the image that went alongside it was of four women with very similar body shapes – tall and slim. The campaign was hugely unsuccessful and sparked immense controversy, with many people complaining that the ad was not an accurate representation of the average woman.

Lesson: Ensure consistency throughout your marketing campaigns to ensure that every step of the project has a cohesive and unified tone.

Nesquik

Nesquik’s campaign went off without a hitch, but the company soon learnt the hard way that this doesn’t always equate to success. they spent a great deal of money and a lot of time on creating a campaign that encouraged people to download their app that created bunny ears for your photos and pushed for a new “National Bunny Ears Day.” The campaign resulted in hardly anything and people had no interest in downloading yet another app that didn’t really offer much.

Lesson: Just because your marketing department loves it, doesn’t mean the public will, so put yourself in the shoes of your audience before launching a new campaign.  

Apple

If you’re an iPhone owner, you probably remember randomly receiving a copy of a U2 album onto your iPhone, without your consent or desire. At the time, Apple thought it would be a good idea to give everyone free music – regardless of music preference or storage space. As you can probably tell the campaign wasn’t much of a success!

Lesson: Offer content for specific promotions, but don’t force it upon people.

Having a strategy, goals and plenty of ideas will definitely help your business to achieve its content marketing goals. It’s also important to constantly analyse your content to gain insights into future creation. What’s worked for your brand so far, and what’s failed? Staying on top of your campaigns will definitely help you to stay ahead of the game!

Need help with your content marketing?

Then contact HQ Content Writer today to discuss your content needs!

The Benefits of Content Writing

Content is everywhere, from a leaflet that lands on your doorstep to an email that you just received from your favourite clothing brand. Everywhere we turn we are presented with content, and without even realising it, we are massively influenced by the content that surrounds us.

In today’s multifaceted world where we are presented with so many different options when it comes to communication, the world of content marketing has never been more diverse or exciting.

Just a few of the many examples include email and social media as well as text messaging, WhatsApp, Viber, Skype and much more. As you can see, the means of communicating are almost infinite.

As a result of this, content writing is not some sort of passing fad soon to be replaced with something more exciting, but is a meaningful, powerful and important means of communication. It enables us to get our message across not only as individuals but also as businesses, and is a fantastic tool when it comes to promoting a brand, product or service.

As a business, it is vital that you take full advantage of content writing and its many capabilities.

Since beginning my career as a freelance content writer, I have helped countless businesses to get their messages across in an articulate, meaningful and clear way. I have helped businesses to resonate with their audiences, to communicate with them in a clearer brand voice and to successfully sell their products and services to audiences from across the globe.

This is the power of content marketing.

Content is definitely here to stay so if you’re seeking a steady, secure and reliable means of improving your SEO, promoting your products or services, communicating with your audience and increasing your client base, then it is definitely wise to invest in content writing.

5 Common Spelling & Grammar Mistakes to Avoid to Improve your Writing

 

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I admit some of these still confuse me even though I’m a seasoned writer (nobody’s perfect:)), so don’t be afraid to refer back to this list during your writing to avoid making unnecessary mistakes.

Fewer than and Less than

Less is used for hypothetical quantities. E.g. “There are fewer than 30 children in my son’s class,” or “there are fewer seasonal fruits to choose from in winter.” On the other hand, less than is used for something that can’t be counted or doesn’t have a plural (e.g. money, time, air, rain, music.) E.g. “Susan eats less than me,” “It snowed less in Alaska this year.”

Affect and Effect

Once you learn the difference here, this one’s pretty easy. The key to remembering this one is that “affect” is almost always a verb (e.g., “The loud music affects my ears”) while “effect” is almost always a noun (e.g., “I love the effect that music has on my mood.”). While “affect” means to influence or create an impression, “effect” describes the result or the outcome.

Farther and Further

The word “farther” implies a measurable distance. “Further” should be reserved for abstract lengths you can’t always measure. e.g., I swam the ball fifty feet farther than Harry. e.g., The earthquake caused further implications.

Disinterested and Uninterested

Despite what most people think, these words are not synonymous. A “disinterested” person is someone who has an impartial perspective. For example, a judge or referee is disinterested because he or she is operating from a neutral perspective. If you want to write a sentence to imply that someone couldn’t care less, then the word you’ll want to use is “uninterested.”

Whether and If

“Whether” and “if” are NOT interchangeable, meaning you can’t replace one with the other. “Whether” expresses a condition where there are two or more alternatives, while “if” expresses a condition where there are no alternatives available. E.g., I don’t know whether I’ll go to the party on Friday. e.g., I can’t go to the party on Friday if I don’t get paid in time. 

Which words confuse you the most? Leave a comment below and let me know!

How to Become a Successful Content Writer

Writing is a dream job; well one that I always dreamed of as a young child anyway. It has always been my dream to create content, and although my ultimate mission is to write books (I’m still working on that), I have been fortunate enough to pursue my dreams as a content writer for the past 10 plus years, and that is something I’m very proud of.

While successful content writers might seem to have an enviable job with their own schedules and the chance to work from wherever they please, it is important to remember that it takes time, energy and determination to make it as a successful content writer.

Below are my top 5 tips on how to become a successful content writer!

1. Master a range of writing styles

As a content writer, I’m asked to write different types of content all the time. From press releases and formal articles to casual blog posts and persuasive social media content, I’ve created countless different types of content for an array of industries. If you want to achieve success in your content writing, you need to be able to master different styles of writing, as this is what increases your value and therefore makes you more in demand.

2. Focus on originality

When I create content, I want people to be able to identify my writing, my voice and my perspective, and I can only do this by generating original, unique writing that comes from the heart. If I’m not happy with the finished product I’ll write it and rewrite it until I’m 100% happy with it.

3. Be persistent

It can be disheartening when you’re struggling to build up your client base, especially in the beginning. Don’t give up; it takes hard work, determination and persistence to find your first set of clients, but once you land even just one client, from there you will be in the perfect position to build your client base even further.

4. Read, read, read

Yes it’s essential that you write frequently, but you also need to read voraciously. Articles, novels, social media updates – even the subtitles on a video; read as much as you can and as often as you can.  This will help to expand your vocabulary, inspire thoughts and ideas, teach you about industry best practices and keep you up-to-date with goings on around the world. Staying in the loop is essential if you want to stay ahead of the game and remain valuable as a content writer.

5. Learn HTML, SEO, CSS and WordPress

Even the most basic knowledge of the above will be of value to you as a content writer. Up-to-date SEO knowledge is important because Google is constantly changing its algorithms and writers need to keep up with these changes. One factor that is not going to change anytime soon is this: high-quality will always be in demand. If you can create high-quality, original content then you will always be in demand.

As I said above, a successful career in content writing requires hard work, determination and persistence, while it’s essential that you stay ahead of the game by maintaining your knowledge of different industries.

What are your thoughts on successful content writing? Leave a comment and let me know!

 

 

March Musings

Taking a Moment to Reflect on the Past Month 

March was a difficult month for me on a number of levels (for reasons I won’t get into here), but I wholeheartedly believe in the power of positive thinking and the overwhelming effects it has on the mind, body and spirit.

As cliché as it sounds, being positive really is a game changer, not just because it calms the heart rate and brings back that twinkle in your eye, but also because it really has the power to adjust your frame of mind and help you to see the good in a seemingly bad situation.

Life is an odd thing but we’re all here, facing its challenges in our own unique ways. I know for one that I am always trying to be the best version of myself possible, whether in my professional or personal life.

Within my content writing, I’m always aspiring to push myself further and further and produce the best work imaginable. With each piece of content I produce, I scour it with a fine-tooth comb, checking it and re-checking it to see how it can be improved. Only when I’m truly happy with it will I click ‘Publish’ or ‘Send.’

As a mother, I’m always trying to educate myself and do the best thing for my children, which isn’t always easy (we all lose our tempers sometimes ;)) but it is a challenge I am wholeheartedly embracing through all the tears, tantrums, trials and tribulations (that’s enough alliteration for one day), and of course through all the joy, laughter and happiness that resonates through our home on a daily basis.

There are plenty of other versions of ‘me’ including wife, daughter, sister and friend, and I’m always committed to pushing myself beyond any metaphorical boundary and being the best version of myself I can possibly be, no matter which role I am filling at that moment.

With that in mind, I wish you all a happy, healthy and prosperous month ahead.

Here’s to positivity!