Interesting Terminology You’ll (Probably) Never Need to Use

Just to prove I learnt a thing or two at university, here is some interesting terminology that stuck with me since my days as a student!

You can use these terms to impress others; and who knows, they may prove handy at some point or another!

Onomatopoeia

This means that it sounds exactly as it is read. Examples include “Bang!” “Crash!” “Cuckoo” and “Sizzle.”

Some examples:

“The water plopped into the pond.”

“The birds whistled and the frogs croaked.”

“The breeze whooshed above us and around us.”

Onomatopoeia is used by authors to describe sounds and is generally considered one of the easiest ways to do so.

Palindrome

A palindrome is a word, phrase, number or sentence that, when turned around, remains exactly the same. The term is derived from the Greek words, “Palin”, which means again, and “dromos” which means way or direction.

For instance:

“Was it a cat I saw?” or even “Was it a car or a cat I saw?”

“Never odd or even.”

Turn them around and you will see they remain exactly the same!

Palindromes are primarily used for entertainment or amusement purposes and are not really used so much in literature (or not very well, anyway).

Oxymoron

This is a figure of speech in which contradictory terms appear next to one another. Oxymorons are mostly used in literature and other rhetorical devices for a number of reasons, from creating drama for the reader (or listener) or to make a person stop and really think about what they’ve just read or heard.

Some classic examples include:

“She stayed falsely true to herself”

“This painting is painfully beautiful”

“His voice is amazingly awful”

The woman cried happy tears”

“He is awfully good at sport”

“It was my only choice.”

Andy Warhol once famously said, “I am a deeply superficial person” while Winston Churchill once said, “A joke is actually an extremely really serious issue.” Thanks for those confusing thoughts, gentlemen.

Can you think of any examples of oxymorons?

I loved studying the English Language and still love learning all about its intricacies!

What really stuck with you during your studies?

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Waiting for the Gift of Sound and Vision

When I read a piece of my written work, I listen to the way it sounds. Okay, I’m not writing poetry or the lyrics to a song, but that doesn’t matter. Regardless, my writing has to have a flow, a rhythm, and a pleasing sound, in order for me to be satisfied with it.

Just like the waves crashing against the shore, a car’s tyres crunching against a gravelled driveway or Bob Dylan singing “Don’t Think Twice it’s Alright” (some of my many favourite sounds), a piece of writing must sound satisfying.

Sound is just as important in your writing as other elements such as research, flow and quality of writing, so when you’ve finished a piece of work, read it and re-read it to hear how it sounds. Are you satisfied with how it sounds?

Great, then let’s move onto how it looks!

As David Bowie said in his song, Sound and Vision, “I will sit right down, waiting for the gift of sound and vision.”

Just as sound is important to the flow of your content, so too is vision.

It’s vital for your work to be visually appealing.

It’s no longer okay to write heavy, chunky paragraphs laden with opulent, fancy vocabulary.

Your paragraphs need to be short, sweet and to the point.

When your audience sees a piece of text that looks visually appealing, they will be much more likely to dive right in.

Then, when it sounds just as good as it looks, they’ll want to stay with you – right until the end of the piece.

So sit right down, get inspired and wait for the gift of sound and vision to influence your writing and elevate it to the next level!

“Don’t Think Twice it’s All Right”

There’s something about a well-written song that resonates so deeply with me. When one of my favourite songs comes on, I just want to drop what I’m doing, close my eyes and listen to it on full blast, taking in all the elements from the instruments used to the nuances and emotions of the singer’s voice.

There’s something about the way Dylan sings this song, and the lyrics he wrote to accompany it are intelligent and pretty brutal in some aspects! It’s hard to believe he was just 21 when he wrote this song; he is such a smart and eloquent songwriter, and absolutely deserving of the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Dylan’s written some incredible songs including Blowin’ in the Wind, The Times They are a Changin’ and Subterranean Homesick Blues, but Don’t Think Twice It’s All Right is by far my favourite Dylan song of all time.

Writing lyrics isn’t something that comes naturally to me but I have tried songwriting on a number of occasions and I must say it is a very therapeutic and cathartic process that I thoroughly enjoy. But if I was half as good as Dylan, I’d definitely be writing songs for a living.

Have a good read of these and see what you think; hope you enjoy them as much as I do:

(P.S. Can you spot the grammar mistake? We forgive you, Dylan!)

It ain’t no use to sit and wonder why, babe
It don’t matter, anyhow
An’ it ain’t no use to sit and wonder why, babe
If you don’t know by now
When your rooster crows at the break of dawn
Look out your window and I’ll be gone
You’re the reason I’m trav’lin’ on
Don’t think twice, it’s all right

It ain’t no use in turnin’ on your light, babe
That light I never knowed
An’ it ain’t no use in turnin’ on your light, babe
I’m on the dark side of the road
Still I wish there was somethin’ you would do or say
To try and make me change my mind and stay
We never did too much talkin’ anyway
So don’t think twice, it’s all right

It ain’t no use in callin’ out my name, gal
Like you never did before
It ain’t no use in callin’ out my name, gal
I can’t hear you anymore
I’m a-thinkin’ and a-wond’rin’ all the way down the road
I once loved a woman, a child I’m told
I give her my heart but she wanted my soul
But don’t think twice, it’s all right

I’m walkin’ down that long, lonesome road, babe
Where I’m bound, I can’t tell
But goodbye’s too good a word, gal
So I’ll just say fare thee well
I ain’t sayin’ you treated me unkind
You could have done better but I don’t mind
You just kinda wasted my precious time
But don’t think twice, it’s all right

Copyright © 1963 by Warner Bros. Inc.; renewed 1991 by Special Rider Music

5 Common Spelling & Grammar Mistakes to Avoid to Improve your Writing

 

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I admit some of these still confuse me even though I’m a seasoned writer (nobody’s perfect:)), so don’t be afraid to refer back to this list during your writing to avoid making unnecessary mistakes.

Fewer than and Less than

Less is used for hypothetical quantities. E.g. “There are fewer than 30 children in my son’s class,” or “there are fewer seasonal fruits to choose from in winter.” On the other hand, less than is used for something that can’t be counted or doesn’t have a plural (e.g. money, time, air, rain, music.) E.g. “Susan eats less than me,” “It snowed less in Alaska this year.”

Affect and Effect

Once you learn the difference here, this one’s pretty easy. The key to remembering this one is that “affect” is almost always a verb (e.g., “The loud music affects my ears”) while “effect” is almost always a noun (e.g., “I love the effect that music has on my mood.”). While “affect” means to influence or create an impression, “effect” describes the result or the outcome.

Farther and Further

The word “farther” implies a measurable distance. “Further” should be reserved for abstract lengths you can’t always measure. e.g., I swam the ball fifty feet farther than Harry. e.g., The earthquake caused further implications.

Disinterested and Uninterested

Despite what most people think, these words are not synonymous. A “disinterested” person is someone who has an impartial perspective. For example, a judge or referee is disinterested because he or she is operating from a neutral perspective. If you want to write a sentence to imply that someone couldn’t care less, then the word you’ll want to use is “uninterested.”

Whether and If

“Whether” and “if” are NOT interchangeable, meaning you can’t replace one with the other. “Whether” expresses a condition where there are two or more alternatives, while “if” expresses a condition where there are no alternatives available. E.g., I don’t know whether I’ll go to the party on Friday. e.g., I can’t go to the party on Friday if I don’t get paid in time. 

Which words confuse you the most? Leave a comment below and let me know!