How to Create a Press Kit for your Business

I recently collaborated with an upcoming jewellery designer to create a press kit for her new brand.

Working closely with the designer, we created a press kit that appropriately represented her new brand whilst providing the right amount of information to potential press.

The kit needed to be professionally presented and structured in order to brief the press but also to ensure the information was correctly communicated.

I used an 8- step structure to create the kit, which consisted of:

1. The Who, What, When, Where, Why and How of the brand

This stage involved gathering as much information as possible from the designer. I wanted to create something that would provide the press with an all-round understanding of the brand whilst maintaining the brand’s messaging, voicing and integrity.

Here, I began the press kit with an overview of the company and some background information, including the Who, What, When, Where, Why and How of the brand. I wanted to keep the press kit professional and accessible, as the whole point of a press kit is to ensure that the press can access the information they need quickly and easily.

This section included information about the jewellery collection, including what the jewellery items were made from and where the stones and diamonds were sourced from.

We then provided information on how the brand was launched and where the source of inspiration came from for creating the jewellery collection, followed by details about sponsors and exhibitions.

For section one, I also created a Mission Statement for the company, as well as a paragraph of text outlining the company’s vision.

2. Biography of CEO/founder

This section is all about the founder/founders of the company, as well as any notable execs who require a mention. For the jewellery brand, we focused on creating a biography of the jewellery designer, including how she became interested in jewellery and jewellery design/creation, as well as some background information on her work experience and academia.

A biography is something rather personal so you have to collaborate closely with each individual to include the information they wish to be included, in a manner that they are happy with. When working with the designer, there were certain aspects that she wanted to emphasise, and others that she didn’t feel were necessary to mention. We worked carefully together on this section to ensure the content appropriately reflected who she is and how she wants to be portrayed.

3. Any recent Press Releases

If you have any recent press releases, these need to be added to this section.

4. Product/Services Fact Sheet

In this section, I emphasised what sets this jewellery brand apart from the competition. We focused on some key areas of the jewellery that are unique, including where the inspiration came from four specific pieces, what each piece is made from and some specific details about the materials used to create each piece. We also mentioned where the items are available to purchase and some information about placing orders.

Of course, this section is unique to each brand and can be structured in line with your preferences. Some businesses prefer an ‘FAQ’ style factsheet – it is totally up to you. What’s important is that you collaborate with the writer to ensure the section is structured and written in a manner that positively represents your brand and provides all the information the press would require in a clear and accessible way.

5. Case Studies

If your business or brand has received any customer testimonials, these need to be included here. They must be professionally presented and directed at the media, but must not have any promotional ties (remember the press kit is for the media and therefore not for marketing purposes).

6. Any Noteworthy Press Coverage

If the company has any press coverage or up-to-date media (including relevant news) this is where it should be showcased. Anything that shows that brand/founder as an industry leader should be included here. When including press coverage, the name of the original outlet and a link to the original article should also be featured.

7. Industry Awards, achievements and accolades

Here we included any notable awards, achievements, mentions and accolades the brand has received, including a brief description of each. The purpose of this section is to highlight the brand’s importance in its field and position it as a company the media needs to know about.

8. Contact information

Finally, it may seem obvious but a press kit is not a press kit without some contact information! This section needs (at the minimum) an email address and telephone number, but it would also be worth adding a website address, physical address and some social media contacts.

Press kits are unique to each and every business, but this is the structure I personally adhere to when creating one. It ensures that information gets included in a consistent, factual manner that is easily accessible to the press, whilst giving an opportunity to showcase the brand and what makes it special.

If you’re looking for a writer to create your Press Kit or other materials, get in touch!

 

Why Hiring a Freelance Content Writer Could be Right for You

Fresh, high-quality content is the perfect recipe for more leads and conversions and improved SEO rankings. By hiring a freelancer, a range of content will be delivered professionally including blog posts, articles, website content, SEO pages and much more.

If you’re thinking about hiring a freelancer writer but aren’t sure if it’s right for you, here are 6 benefits to bear in mind:

Get fresh, well-written, industry-relevant content

The amount of research, time and commitment it takes to create something completely new should never be understated. Professional freelance content writers perform plenty of research into the requested subject, taking their time to determine the right angle and tone of voice. Elements such as quality, grammar and appearance are also taken into account, as well as keywords, metadata and much more.

Increase conversions with CTAs

Freelancers are skilled and adept at writing strong calls-to-action. CTAs have the power to prompt customers, visitors or leads to take action, whether that action involves downloading your e-book, attending your latest event or contacting your company. Your CTA must be simple and to the point while being informative and engaging. It also needs to be positioned somewhere eye-catching to increase the chances of it being seen and accessed.

Increase SEO rankings

With competition so rife across the internet, it’s essential that your content is of the highest quality so that it attracts Google’s web crawlers, and ranks your site appropriately. Elements such as meta titles, meta descriptions, headlines, keywords and keyword phrases are all vital contributors when it comes to improving your search engine rankings. In turn, your target audience is more likely to see your content and respond to it.

Give your company a stronger brand voice

When a potential customer visits your website, they want to learn more about your company and what it would be like to work with it. It’s so important that your content establishes your brand voice, not just across your website but across all other channels including your social media platforms, emails and other marketing materials.

When you hire a freelancer, they’ll work together with you to craft content that reflects your branding and corporate message. Before you know it, they’ll know the ins and outs of your company so well that they’ll be able to create appropriately branded, well-written content quickly and easily.

Bring old content to life

When you scan through your current content, consider what can be refreshed and repurposed. Many times, the information is there, it just needs refining and tweaking to bring it up-to-date and make it more appealing to your target audience. This information can also be used to create new types of content, such as infographics, podcasts, email newsletters and webinars. This gives it even greater opportunities to reach a wider audience and improve your presence on the web.

Save time and money

Skilled content writers are superb timesavers. They get the work done, creating something carefully written, error-free and insightful. They deliver the results you want, in an eloquent, skilled way.

Have you considered hiring a freelance writer?

Freelancers are passionate, committed and always striving to exceed your expectations in order to work with you again. You’ll develop a direct relationship with the writer, and be able to communicate your exact needs.

Contact HQ Content Writer today to discuss your unique content writing needs!

 

 

 

Waiting for the Gift of Sound and Vision

When I read a piece of my written work, I listen to the way it sounds. Okay, I’m not writing poetry or the lyrics to a song, but that doesn’t matter. Regardless, my writing has to have a flow, a rhythm, and a pleasing sound, in order for me to be satisfied with it.

Just like the waves crashing against the shore, a car’s tyres crunching against a gravelled driveway or Bob Dylan singing “Don’t Think Twice it’s Alright” (some of my many favourite sounds), a piece of writing must sound satisfying.

Sound is just as important in your writing as other elements such as research, flow and quality of writing, so when you’ve finished a piece of work, read it and re-read it to hear how it sounds. Are you satisfied with how it sounds?

Great, then let’s move onto how it looks!

As David Bowie said in his song, Sound and Vision, “I will sit right down, waiting for the gift of sound and vision.”

Just as sound is important to the flow of your content, so too is vision.

It’s vital for your work to be visually appealing.

It’s no longer okay to write heavy, chunky paragraphs laden with opulent, fancy vocabulary.

Your paragraphs need to be short, sweet and to the point.

When your audience sees a piece of text that looks visually appealing, they will be much more likely to dive right in.

Then, when it sounds just as good as it looks, they’ll want to stay with you – right until the end of the piece.

So sit right down, get inspired and wait for the gift of sound and vision to influence your writing and elevate it to the next level!

5 Common Spelling & Grammar Mistakes to Avoid to Improve your Writing

 

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I admit some of these still confuse me even though I’m a seasoned writer (nobody’s perfect:)), so don’t be afraid to refer back to this list during your writing to avoid making unnecessary mistakes.

Fewer than and Less than

Less is used for hypothetical quantities. E.g. “There are fewer than 30 children in my son’s class,” or “there are fewer seasonal fruits to choose from in winter.” On the other hand, less than is used for something that can’t be counted or doesn’t have a plural (e.g. money, time, air, rain, music.) E.g. “Susan eats less than me,” “It snowed less in Alaska this year.”

Affect and Effect

Once you learn the difference here, this one’s pretty easy. The key to remembering this one is that “affect” is almost always a verb (e.g., “The loud music affects my ears”) while “effect” is almost always a noun (e.g., “I love the effect that music has on my mood.”). While “affect” means to influence or create an impression, “effect” describes the result or the outcome.

Farther and Further

The word “farther” implies a measurable distance. “Further” should be reserved for abstract lengths you can’t always measure. e.g., I swam the ball fifty feet farther than Harry. e.g., The earthquake caused further implications.

Disinterested and Uninterested

Despite what most people think, these words are not synonymous. A “disinterested” person is someone who has an impartial perspective. For example, a judge or referee is disinterested because he or she is operating from a neutral perspective. If you want to write a sentence to imply that someone couldn’t care less, then the word you’ll want to use is “uninterested.”

Whether and If

“Whether” and “if” are NOT interchangeable, meaning you can’t replace one with the other. “Whether” expresses a condition where there are two or more alternatives, while “if” expresses a condition where there are no alternatives available. E.g., I don’t know whether I’ll go to the party on Friday. e.g., I can’t go to the party on Friday if I don’t get paid in time. 

Which words confuse you the most? Leave a comment below and let me know!