The Benefits of Content Writing

Content is everywhere, from a leaflet that lands on your doorstep to an email that you just received from your favourite clothing brand. Everywhere we turn we are presented with content, and without even realising it, we are massively influenced by the content that surrounds us.

In today’s multifaceted world where we are presented with so many different options when it comes to communication, the world of content marketing has never been more diverse or exciting. Just a few of the many examples include email and social media as well as text messaging, WhatsApp, Viber, Skype and much more. As you can see, the means of communicating are almost infinite.

As a result of this, content writing is not some sort of passing fad soon to be replaced with something more exciting, but is a meaningful, powerful and important means of communication. It enables us to get our message across not only as individuals but also as businesses, and is a fantastic tool when it comes to promoting a brand, product or service.

As a business, it is vital that you take full advantage of content writing and its many capabilities. Since beginning my career as a freelance content writer, I have helped countless businesses to get their messages across in an articulate, meaningful and clear way. I have helped businesses to resonate with their audiences, to communicate with them in a clearer brand voice and to successfully sell their products and services to audiences from across the globe.

This is the power of content marketing.

Content is definitely here to stay so if you’re seeking a steady, secure and reliable means of improving your SEO, promoting your products or services, communicating with your audience and increasing your client base, then it is definitely wise to invest in content.

Advertisements

Interesting Terminology You’ll (Probably) Never Need to Use

Just to prove I learnt a thing or two at university, here is some interesting terminology that stuck with me since my days as a student!

You can use these terms to impress others; and who knows, they may prove handy at some point or another!

Onomatopoeia

This means that it sounds exactly as it is read. Examples include “Bang!” “Crash!” “Cuckoo” and “Sizzle.”

Some examples:

“The water plopped into the pond.”

“The birds whistled and the frogs croaked.”

“The breeze whooshed above us and around us.”

Onomatopoeia is used by authors to describe sounds and is generally considered one of the easiest ways to do so.

Palindrome

A palindrome is a word, phrase, number or sentence that, when turned around, remains exactly the same. The term is derived from the Greek words, “Palin”, which means again, and “dromos” which means way or direction.

For instance:

“Was it a cat I saw?” or even “Was it a car or a cat I saw?”

“Never odd or even.”

Turn them around and you will see they remain exactly the same!

Palindromes are primarily used for entertainment or amusement purposes and are not really used so much in literature (or not very well, anyway).

Oxymoron

This is a figure of speech in which contradictory terms appear next to one another. Oxymorons are mostly used in literature and other rhetorical devices for a number of reasons, from creating drama for the reader (or listener) or to make a person stop and really think about what they’ve just read or heard.

Some classic examples include:

“She stayed falsely true to herself”

“This painting is painfully beautiful”

“His voice is amazingly awful”

The woman cried happy tears”

“He is awfully good at sport”

“It was my only choice.”

Andy Warhol once famously said, “I am a deeply superficial person” while Winston Churchill once said, “A joke is actually an extremely really serious issue.” Thanks for those confusing thoughts, gentlemen.

Can you think of any examples of oxymorons?

I loved studying the English Language and still love learning all about its intricacies!

What really stuck with you during your studies?

Waiting for the Gift of Sound and Vision

When I read a piece of my written work, I listen to the way it sounds. Okay, I’m not writing poetry or the lyrics to a song, but that doesn’t matter. Regardless, my writing has to have a flow, a rhythm, and a pleasing sound, in order for me to be satisfied with it.

Just like the waves crashing against the shore, a car’s tyres crunching against a gravelled driveway or Bob Dylan singing “Don’t Think Twice it’s Alright” (some of my many favourite sounds), a piece of writing must sound satisfying.

Sound is just as important in your writing as other elements such as research, flow and quality of writing, so when you’ve finished a piece of work, read it and re-read it to hear how it sounds. Are you satisfied with how it sounds?

Great, then let’s move onto how it looks!

As David Bowie said in his song, Sound and Vision, “I will sit right down, waiting for the gift of sound and vision.”

Just as sound is important to the flow of your content, so too is vision.

It’s vital for your work to be visually appealing.

It’s no longer okay to write heavy, chunky paragraphs laden with opulent, fancy vocabulary.

Your paragraphs need to be short, sweet and to the point.

When your audience sees a piece of text that looks visually appealing, they will be much more likely to dive right in.

Then, when it sounds just as good as it looks, they’ll want to stay with you – right until the end of the piece.

So sit right down, get inspired and wait for the gift of sound and vision to influence your writing and elevate it to the next level!